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Students gather for nation wide walkout

The March 14 National School Walkout garners support from approximately 66 Scappoose Students.

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Students gather for nation wide walkout

Students read names of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting.

Students read names of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting.

Students read names of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting.

Students read names of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting.

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Video of Scappoose students speaking at the March 14 walkout, in honor of the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting and to protest for gun legislation.

Today, approximately 66 students assembled outside of the school in solidarity with Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting victims and protesting current gun control laws.

At 10 am local time, students left class for 17 minutes, with each minute representing a student killed in the Florida shooting a month ago on February 14.

Montana Poppenhagen speaks on issues of gun violence and welcome students to the walkout.

The walkout was led by Montana Poppenhagen. 

Students that attended the walkout will have Saturday school in the coming future for their unexcused absences.

Ali Mayeda, a representative for Suzanne Bonamici, addressed the crowd with a letter written by the congresswoman.

“Like you, I refuse to accept school shootings as normal.” The letter said. “Thank you for turning your grief into action and for leading the way to keep our communities safe.”  

Multiple students addressed the crowd and shared their beliefs on gun violence and legislation.

Nicole Flannagan addresses the crowd on gun violence.

“I don’t want my sisters coming home one day and not seeing me. I don’t want to go home and not see my sisters one day,” said SHS Junior, Nicole Flanagan. “If I lost my sister, I would lose myself.”

When asked what she hoped the impact of the protest would be Flanagan said, “I’m hoping that it will convince people that this is a serious issue for people that don’t think it is. I have family that told me not to do this so I told them to pretty much go away and I did it anyways.”

The walkout ended with a moment of silence for the 17 victims killed in the Florida shooting.

Students bow their heads in a moment of silence.

Prior to the scheduled 10 am walk out, teachers were asked to read an email from principal Jones aloud. The email stated that this event was not a district-sponsored event and outlined the procedures that teachers were expected to follow.

“Students may participate if they choose to do so. If students choose to leave your class let them go. You do not need to try to stop them or talk them out of leaving.” Teachers were additionally instructed to “send [Mr. Jones] an email indicating students that choose to leave [their] class.”

Jones suggested school policy for students participating in the walkout should be kept consistent with the student handbook. According to Jones, the protest qualifies as “an act of civil disobedience” and as such the penalty would be the same as if the student had simply left the classroom without permission.

Students gathered near the bus turn around for the walkout.

The student handbook states that “Truancy is defined as a situation in which a student is absent from school or any class without permission” and lists the punishments as “detention, suspension, expulsion, and inability to participate in athletics or other activities and/or loss of driving privileges.”

About 11 percent of the student body participated in the walkout today.

“I didn’t go because there are other ways you could show support to the kids that are in that situation. I don’t feel the need to walk out for 17 minutes to go do that. I would definitely support something but in a different way,” said Conner Havlik, when asked why he chose not to walk out.

Student advocating for stricter guns laws.

Students return to class after the walkout.

 

 

 

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